Target Talk

Don Nygord: A Question about Pistol Trigger Placement

Posted by Bob LeDoux on February 17, 2001 at 11:53:53:
About 12 years ago, you made a comment in U.S. Airgun magazine about pistol trigger placement. It was your experience that small amounts front-to-back adjustment could result in significant changes to the size of target groups.
Do you still stand behind that statement? Give us some more details.
P.S. It is nice to see your name appear here.

Posted by Don Nygord on February 18, 2001 at 11:49:15:
Yes, the fact that trigger (or finger) placement can affect shot delivery has not changed with the passage of time. Changes as small as 1/8" can have a pretty dramatic effect. One starts with the conventional "tip of finger perpendicular to the bore" and then you can experiment from there. This can be particularly necessary if you find most of your errors in trigger release go in either to the right or left consistently. Just don't overdo it - try a setting for a while and RECORD the results before trying another.
Don
: About 12 years ago, you made a comment in U.S. Airgun magazine about pistol trigger placement. It was your experience that small amounts front-to-back adjustment could result in significant changes to the size of target groups. : Do you still stand behind that statement? Give us some more details.
: P.S. It is nice to see your name appear here.

Posted by Joe Matusic, MD on February 19, 2001 at 20:40:48:
It helped me to think of this in that the finger tip goes through an arc as you bend it. The trigger should break as the finger is moving directly in line with the barrel (in other words, when the finger pad is perpendicular to the line of the barrel). Before the fingertip gets to this point, you are potentially moving the trigger away from your hand and past this point, you are potentially pulling the trigger towards your hand with the resultant movement of the barrel and shot placement.
Also think of hitting a baseball with a bat. All other things being equal, the ball will go straight back at the pitcher if the bat hits it perpendicular to the path of the ball. Hit it before or after and you go to right or left field.

Posted by Warren on February 18, 2001 at 12:21:23:
I completely agree with Mr. Nygord and would make one extra comment for new shooters who may not take full advantage of this advice.
Make sure you understand that the critical point of the angle of the trigger finger on the trigger shoe is at the breaking point of the sear. So many people set their trigger shoe at a point where it is comfortable for them to sit the finger on the trigger - not realizing that once the first stage is taken up the angle of pull on the trigger finger has changed considerably.

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